Monday, February 1, 2016

Carleton’s Miles Copeland Receives 2016 IEEE Pederson Medal

MCopeland-2-head-and-shoulders-¬S.TunnicliffeCarleton University’s Miles Copeland, professor emeritus in the ‪Faculty of Engineering and Design, has received the 2016 IEEE Donald O. Pederson Award in Solid-State Circuits.

“The research-intensive Faculty of Engineering and Design is extremely proud of Prof. Copeland’s achievements,” said Dean Rafik Goubran. “His outstanding contributions to solid-state circuits have significantly impacted technology and the engineering profession.”

Copeland received the award at the 2016 IEEE International Solid State Circuits Conference in San Francisco on Feb. 1, 2016.

“This award recognizes Carleton’s leadership in engineering research and innovation,” said Copeland. “I appreciate the acknowledgement of my hard work and that of Carleton graduate students, whose research helped Nortel establish itself early on as a dominant company in the telecommunications market.”

The award is named after Don Pederson, a co-founder of the IEEE Solid-State Circuits Council, the forerunner of today’s Solid-State Circuits Society. Pederson was also instrumental in launching the IEEE Journal of Solid-State Circuits.

For nearly a century, the IEEE Awards Program has paid tribute to technical professionals like Copeland, whose exceptional achievements and outstanding contributions have made a lasting impact on technology, society and the engineering profession.

About Copeland
Copeland started his long career at Carleton as a founding member of the Department of Electronics. In addition to serving as chair, his contributions to Carleton included building the research area of analog and radio frequency integrated circuit design and incorporating this research into teaching. He also worked on computing techniques and facilities to enable and reinforce research and teaching in this area.

Copeland was active in consulting and research collaboration with industry, notably at Nortel, Bell Northern Research and General Electric. His widely used research innovations include groundbreaking work that enabled the design of fully integrated radios. His work was key to the design of modern telecommunications circuits, including personal communications devices like cell phones and wireless data communications like WiFi.

He was elevated to Fellow of the IEEE in 1989.

Monday, February 1, 2016 in ,
Share: Twitter, Facebook

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *